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Working Tax Credit - Can I get Working Tax Credit?

Working Tax Credit is money provided to boost the income of working people who are on a low income.

Can I get Working Tax Credit?

Working Tax Credit and Universal Credit

Working Tax Credit is being replaced by Universal Credit.  You will only able to get Working Tax Credit in the situations listed below.  Otherwise, you won't be able to make a new claim for tax credits. Use our calculator to see what benefits you might be able to get. 

If you are on Working Tax Credit and your situation stays the same, you won’t have to claim Universal Credit, at present.  The government started transferring a small number of people over to Universal Credit in July 2019 and it aims to complete this process by December 2023.

Can I get Working Tax Credit?

You can only get Working Tax Credit in the following situations:

  • You are getting tax credits (Working Tax Credit or Child Tax Credit) at present, unless you claim Universal Credit, or
  • You are getting a Severe Disability Premium.

In addition:

You and/or your partner must work full time, though this means a different number of hours per week for different people:

  • Unless you satisfy any of the special conditions below, you will need to be over 25 years old and will need to work at least 30 hours per week,
  • If you are single and are responsible for a child or qualifying young person, you will need to be over 16 years old and will need to work at least 16 hours per week.
  • If you live with a partner who gets ESA, PIP, DLA or Attendance Allowance and you are responsible for a child or qualifying young person you will need to be over 16 years old and will need to work at least 16 hours per week
  • If you live with a partner who gets Carer’s Allowance or who is in hospital or in prison, and you are responsible for a child or qualifying young person, you will need to be over 16 years old and will need to work at least 16 hours per week
  • If you have a disability which means you can get a disability element, you will need to be over 16 years old and will need to work at least 16 hours per week
  • If you are over 60 years old you will have to work at least 16 hours per week.

If your hours are not the same every week or you need help to calculate how many hours you work, see our Working hours guide.

What happens to my Working Tax Credit if I start a new relationship?

If you claimed tax credits as a single person and you later have a partner who joins your household, you will have to close down your single claim for tax credits. You won’t be able to make a new claim for tax credits. If you still want the help tax credits were providing you will need to get it through Universal Credit. This does not apply if you get a Severe Disability Premium on your existing benefits as a couple. You can use our Benefits Calculator to check whether you would get a Severe Disability Premium on your benefits if you were a couple.

What happens to my Working Tax Credit if I separate from my partner?

If you made a joint claim for Tax Credits as a couple and you later separate, you will have to close down your joint claim for tax credits.  You won’t be able to make a new claim for tax credits. If you still want the help tax credits were providing you will need to get it through Universal Credit. This does not apply if you get a Severe Disability Premium on your existing benefits.

 

Updated: July 2019

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